MM Novato Uncategorized ,,,,,

nightwatch-diagram

We had a chance to setup a NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor made by BioSensory Inc. and wanted to share our thoughts on the product.  With a retail price of around $399 the Nightwatch Bed Bed Bug Monitor isn’t cheap, but it does offer some unique advantages in monitoring and treating bed bugs.

What Is A NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor:

To understand the NightWatch we must first understand what attracts bed bugs.  Bed bugs are drawn to their next blood meal by the carbon dioxide (CO2) we exhale along with the body heat we give off.  By using a heating element, CO2 and a kairomone lure attractant, the NightWatch has been proven to be 99.98% effective in detecting bed bugs over a 7 day period.  On each side of the NightWatch, there are carpet like ramps that allow the bed bugs to climb up on there way to the attractant kairomone lure, heat, and CO2.  Once the bed bug reaches the top of the ramp they fall into a white collection plate where they can then be visually detected.  The collection area on each side of the NightWatch is so close to the heating element that the heat dries out the bed bugs fairly quick causing the bed bugs to expire.

Why Use The NightWatch:

The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor is useful in three unique ways:

1).  To Detect Bed Bugs- Before beginning treatment for bed bugs it important to know for sure that you have them.  Many people have bites and never see the actual bed bugs, which makes knowing for sure if you have them difficult.  Also, some people think they have bed bugs, but are actually being bitten by something else including fire ants, mosquitos, fleas or are suffering from an allergic reaction to something.  The NightWatch allows the user to check if they have bed bugs with considerable accuracy before beginning a treatment.  This can save time and money in unneeded bed bug treatments if the NightWatch fails to find anything.

2).  Treating Bed Bugs In Unoccupied Room- One of the biggest mistakes people make is changing rooms during a bed bug infestation.  If you were to be bitten by bed bugs and then move to an adjacent spare bedroom for refuge, there is a good chance that some of the bed bugs may follow you.  The problem arrises when you move back to your original bedroom leaving behind bed bugs that can remain inactive for many months waiting for someone to return and sleep in the room.  Even if you were to apply powders and spray in the spare room, there is nothing to re-activate the bed bugs so that they cross over the sprays and powders making treatments ineffective.  With the NightWatch, it’s like having someone sleeping in that room again creating a lure bed bugs can’t refuse.  This allows the chemicals and powders to do their job once the bed bugs become mobile again.  The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor can be setup and re-used in any room of the house helping to increase your chances of success treating sleeping bed bugs.

3).  Knowing When The Bed Bugs Are Gone-  Another popular use for the NightWatch is for monitoring to know when the bed bugs are gone.  You can continually monitor your bedroom during treatment to see if the population of bed bugs is increasing, decreasing or are gone.  This offers peace of mind in knowing when you are bed bug free!

Setting Up The NightWatch:

The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor is easy to setup, but does have a few special instructions that you must followed.  After receiving your NightWatch, you will also need to purchase a CO2 bottle from the local paint ball store, Lowes, Dicks Sporting Goods or Home Depot.  We suggest purchasing from a paint ball store as the service is normally better and they often carry replacement gaskets for the CO2 bottle.  It’s very important to use a new replacement gasket for each new bottle to ensure the bottle doesn’t leak and will last for the full 7 days.  Seals are inexpensive at about 20 cents each. When selecting the CO2 bottle, be sure to purchase one between 18-22 ounces with a brass fitting, which is the most common (stay away from galvanized steel fittings).  CO2 or Carbon Dioxide is completely safe to use in your home an is non-flamable (simply the air we exhale).

Once you have the CO2 bottle simply place the Kairomone lure on top of the NightWatch, spin the CO2 bottle into place, plug it in and set the time so the NightWatch knows when to run.  The NightWatch runs between 10 pm and 6 am mimicking our sleep time when bed bugs like to come out.  It took us about 3 minutes to setup the NightWatch after we had the CO2 bottle.  Placing the NightWatch in the center of the room 18″ Inches from anything that may block its attractants is a good place to position the unit.  This offers maximum exposure for bed bugs to locate and get trapped in the NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor.

Overall the NightWatch requires some legwork to get the CO2 bottle required to run the unit, but it does do a great job of monitoring and treating for bed bugs in unoccupied rooms.  If you have any experiences with the NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor drop us a comment or email us at [email protected]

NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor (review)

nightwatch-diagram

We had a chance to setup a NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor made by BioSensory Inc. and wanted to share our thoughts on the product.  With a retail price of around $399 the Nightwatch Bed Bed Bug Monitor isn’t cheap, but it does offer some unique advantages in monitoring and treating bed bugs.

What Is A NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor:

To understand the NightWatch we must first understand what attracts bed bugs.  Bed bugs are drawn to their next blood meal by the carbon dioxide (CO2) we exhale along with the body heat we give off.  By using a heating element, CO2 and a kairomone lure attractant, the NightWatch has been proven to be 99.98% effective in detecting bed bugs over a 7 day period.  On each side of the NightWatch, there are carpet like ramps that allow the bed bugs to climb up on there way to the attractant kairomone lure, heat, and CO2.  Once the bed bug reaches the top of the ramp they fall into a white collection plate where they can then be visually detected.  The collection area on each side of the NightWatch is so close to the heating element that the heat dries out the bed bugs fairly quick causing the bed bugs to expire.

Why Use The NightWatch:

The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor is useful in three unique ways:

1).  To Detect Bed Bugs- Before beginning treatment for bed bugs it important to know for sure that you have them.  Many people have bites and never see the actual bed bugs, which makes knowing for sure if you have them difficult.  Also, some people think they have bed bugs, but are actually being bitten by something else including fire ants, mosquitos, fleas or are suffering from an allergic reaction to something.  The NightWatch allows the user to check if they have bed bugs with considerable accuracy before beginning a treatment.  This can save time and money in unneeded bed bug treatments if the NightWatch fails to find anything.

2).  Treating Bed Bugs In Unoccupied Room- One of the biggest mistakes people make is changing rooms during a bed bug infestation.  If you were to be bitten by bed bugs and then move to an adjacent spare bedroom for refuge, there is a good chance that some of the bed bugs may follow you.  The problem arrises when you move back to your original bedroom leaving behind bed bugs that can remain inactive for many months waiting for someone to return and sleep in the room.  Even if you were to apply powders and spray in the spare room, there is nothing to re-activate the bed bugs so that they cross over the sprays and powders making treatments ineffective.  With the NightWatch, it’s like having someone sleeping in that room again creating a lure bed bugs can’t refuse.  This allows the chemicals and powders to do their job once the bed bugs become mobile again.  The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor can be setup and re-used in any room of the house helping to increase your chances of success treating sleeping bed bugs.

3).  Knowing When The Bed Bugs Are Gone-  Another popular use for the NightWatch is for monitoring to know when the bed bugs are gone.  You can continually monitor your bedroom during treatment to see if the population of bed bugs is increasing, decreasing or are gone.  This offers peace of mind in knowing when you are bed bug free!

Setting Up The NightWatch:

The NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor is easy to setup, but does have a few special instructions that you must followed.  After receiving your NightWatch, you will also need to purchase a CO2 bottle from the local paint ball store, Lowes, Dicks Sporting Goods or Home Depot.  We suggest purchasing from a paint ball store as the service is normally better and they often carry replacement gaskets for the CO2 bottle.  It’s very important to use a new replacement gasket for each new bottle to ensure the bottle doesn’t leak and will last for the full 7 days.  Seals are inexpensive at about 20 cents each. When selecting the CO2 bottle, be sure to purchase one between 18-22 ounces with a brass fitting, which is the most common (stay away from galvanized steel fittings).  CO2 or Carbon Dioxide is completely safe to use in your home an is non-flamable (simply the air we exhale).

Once you have the CO2 bottle simply place the Kairomone lure on top of the NightWatch, spin the CO2 bottle into place, plug it in and set the time so the NightWatch knows when to run.  The NightWatch runs between 10 pm and 6 am mimicking our sleep time when bed bugs like to come out.  It took us about 3 minutes to setup the NightWatch after we had the CO2 bottle.  Placing the NightWatch in the center of the room 18″ Inches from anything that may block its attractants is a good place to position the unit.  This offers maximum exposure for bed bugs to locate and get trapped in the NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor.

Overall the NightWatch requires some legwork to get the CO2 bottle required to run the unit, but it does do a great job of monitoring and treating for bed bugs in unoccupied rooms.  If you have any experiences with the NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor drop us a comment or email us at [email protected]

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