MM Novato Reviews

Transcription:

Hello, this is Mark with Bedbugsupply.com and today we’ll be going over the new MR-1000 Forza by Vapamore. It’s a new commercial steam cleaning machine. We just got our hands on it this week, and it’s a very impressive model. It’s actually the highest PSI model we’ve ever used before in a review. It comes in at 90 PSI, has a tip temperature between 270 and 280 temperature Fahrenheit. What that means is bed bugs are killed between 180 and 190 degrees Fahrenheit on contact, and 120 with continuous heat. This one’s well above that, between 270 and 280. When doing a bed bug job with a steamer, the higher the tip temperature, the more it can fill in cracks and crevices. When you treat a couch, sofa, or baseboards, it’s going to fill in those cavities and kill the bed bugs more effectively. Also, for the PSI, when it comes to 90 PSI, that means it’s dryer steam coming out, which takes less time for it to dry.

There are a whole bunch of features that come with it. The Techflex nylon-braided steam hose here makes it more durable for a commercial environment. It has a steam adjustment knob, which is normally found on your commercial units. That allows you to control the steam level of steam coming out, so if you want higher output or lower output, you can control that. Especially on a bed bug job, you don’t want to blow the bed bugs all over the place. So it allows you to get better control. It has over 50 different attachments to it, making every application capable. We like to use more of a triangular attachment. It even has another bed bug attachment, more like a hammerhead attachment. It also has more of a single jet nozzle, which we’ll go into later on in the video.

Operating it, the machine is very simple. Basically, it’s a continuous model. What that means is you have a regular tank here, and it injects into the boiler. When you’re doing a bed bug job, and you have a larger job to do; you don’t have to wait for it to cool down before you refill the unit. You essentially have one tank that injects into the other one so you can continue to steam perpetually, without having to wait for it to cool down. So normally, your higher end machines will have that feature for it. A steam pressure dial is right here. This basically shows you where you’re at with your pressure. Every time you pull the trigger, of course it will come down, and it’ll gradually work its way back up as the boiler is heating the water inside the container back up.

When using it for a professional bed bug job, this piece back here, the basket as well as the handles, you can remove this if you’d like by removing the screws. That makes it easier to keep in the back of a truck or a car. You can use this handle here to carry it around. It’s about 45 pounds, we found when we fill it up with water. It’s not too difficult to carry around, but it is of course a heavier model because it has more of a capacity of water that it holds on to. The casters are heavy duty, these are commercial. The case is made of metal, so it’s very durable, especially if you’re transporting it from room to room as opposed to a plastic unit. It’s less likely to be damaged, and it protects the interior components to it. Given it’s also a commercial model, it’s one of the first units out there that is operated by a computer. For example, when you’re running out of water, an alarm goes off that tells you that you’re low on water. It’s very well managed when it comes to doing a steam job, as well as very simple to operate. You just push the power button here, handle the steam adjustment knob here, so this unit basically does everything by itself.

With different commercial units out there, we found that if the fuse switch ever blows, it’s normally inside of the unit. You’d essentially have to package it back up and mail it back to the manufacturer. This one really has a nice feature in that if it ever happens to you, you can use the switch back here; just press it and it allows you to reset the fuse switch without having to mail it back to the manufacturer, which is a very very nice feature. The unit has a lifetime warranty to back up the unit, which is nice. It shows you the quality of the components. It also has a CEME solenoid to it. Usually when you pull the trigger on a non-commercial unit, it has a mechanical switch inside of the trigger, which allows the steam to come in and out. The only problem with that is, if you pull the trigger and let go of it, the steam inside of the hose turns back into water, and you have to purge the unit. With your higher end machines, including the Forza here, you pull the trigger and it actually has an electronic switch that engages the steam to come out of the unit, as opposed to a switch on the handle. So you get good dry hot steam without the steam usually turning back to water as you pull the trigger. It’s a lot dryer, it’s a lot hotter; you have 90 PSI and 270 temperature, allowing you to fill in those cracks and crevices with heat, and to do a bed bug job much more quickly and much more effectively than a lower PSI and tip temperature. We’re gonna show you some applications of how to use the machine, show you a few of the attachments, and show you how to use this commercial unit to do a bed bug job the right way.

Okay, before we show you what to do with a steamer, I want to show you what not to do first. These are some of the more common mistakes people do when they use a steamer for bed bugs. A lot of people just take the single-nozzle jet attachment, put it on the end here, and pull the trigger. All you’re going to do if you use this single-nozzle jet like that is blow them all over the place. What you want to have is good hot dry steam at the end of the tip that will keep the bed bugs stationary, but get them at the adequate temperature to kill them. So if you use something like this, some people will take the steam knob, turn it all the way up, pull the trigger, and then call us and say, “Oh my gosh, it’s just blowing out cold steam.” If you use the right attachments, like this one that is actually labeled for bed bugs – I took one of the included cloths and put it at the end – turn the steam adjustment down, usually about halfway, when you pull the trigger, you have very little force whatsoever. Within about maybe three to four inches from the tip, it gets incredibly hot (usually between 270 to 280 degrees); it’ll easily kill bed bugs, fill in those cracks and crevices, and actually do a bed bug job properly. Just make sure that when you’re doing a job, that you turn the steam adjustment knob down. When you’re doing tile and grout, you want to use a single-nozzle jet and the right attachments, but for bed bugs, you want to have less pressure coming out and good hot dry steam to kill bed bugs fast.

Now I’m going to show you how to do a sofa properly using the Forza. As an example, I went ahead and took off the main cushion here. When you’re doing the cushions, you want to make sure you’re moving very slowly. In any kind of application, a good rule of thumb is to move at one inch per second. Good hotspots on the cushions would be zippers; as you can see here, there’s a zipper cover. You want to go very slowly around the cushions and hit all of the little sewing seams and cracks where bed bugs might be. Hit those first, put the cushions off to the side, then you want to hit along the base of the sofa, then flip it upside down. Normally, there’s a dust cover held on by staples. Go ahead and remove that; it’s more for aesthetics anyways. Remove the dust cover, get down below the sofa, and hit every single crevice that you can think of as you’re doing the sofa with the Forza. I’m going to show you a great example of where bed bugs might be: at the base corner of the sofa, you see a nice crevice here where bed bugs might be. When you use a steamer, especially one with this kind of tip temperature, you’ll see steam shooting from the left and right hand sides of the bed bug fabric tool. When you pull the trigger, you want to fill in the crevices here, so essentially go across and move about one inch per second; it’s going to fill in all of those crevices. You can see steam all the way down here, and it’s super hot. You’re going to work your way down all the way across. Do that in every corner, crack, and crevice along the sofa, and really take your time, so that if there are bed bugs even down here deep inside, it’s going to kill all of them very quickly. Again, the steam adjustment knob is about halfway, so that you don’t blow them all over the place. If you’re using the right attachment, you get much better control. Now work your way all the way across. Every sofa is different, but you kind of get the idea of how to do the job properly. It’s a great contact killer; you’re just using water to kill bed bugs.

I’m going to show you now how to do small cracks and crevices. We won’t be able to use the bed bug fabric attachment. As I showed you earlier in the video, you have to use the single-nozzle jet attachment properly. We normally like to take a microfiber toweling. You can find this in any kind of Walmart, or use any kind of hand towel you might have around the house. This will help break up some of the pressure, and also absorbs some moisture coming out of the tip. Take a couple of rubber bands here and place them over the end as we can see here. What’s going to happen now is we’re going to turn the steam adjustment knob all the way down to break up the pressure and have good hot dry steam coming out. As you can see here, along the doorframe, there’s very large crevices where bed bugs might be hiding. We’re going to go ahead and move at about one inch per second, and move very slowly down the frame. You’ll have good hot dry steam going in and filling in those cracks, crevices, and voids, and kill any bed bugs that might be around. A better hot spot is down at the bottom of the doorframe; this is about a half an inch. Get in there, move very slowly. If you do it properly, you’ll actually see steam coming out of different crevices of the doorframe as it’s filling in all of the voids.

That concludes our example, so if you have any questions about the steamer and how it operates, you can reach us 7 days a week at www.bedbugsupply.com.

Video: Vapamore Forza Steamer Review

Transcription:

Hello, this is Mark with Bedbugsupply.com and today we’ll be going over the new MR-1000 Forza by Vapamore. It’s a new commercial steam cleaning machine. We just got our hands on it this week, and it’s a very impressive model. It’s actually the highest PSI model we’ve ever used before in a review. It comes in at 90 PSI, has a tip temperature between 270 and 280 temperature Fahrenheit. What that means is bed bugs are killed between 180 and 190 degrees Fahrenheit on contact, and 120 with continuous heat. This one’s well above that, between 270 and 280. When doing a bed bug job with a steamer, the higher the tip temperature, the more it can fill in cracks and crevices. When you treat a couch, sofa, or baseboards, it’s going to fill in those cavities and kill the bed bugs more effectively. Also, for the PSI, when it comes to 90 PSI, that means it’s dryer steam coming out, which takes less time for it to dry.

There are a whole bunch of features that come with it. The Techflex nylon-braided steam hose here makes it more durable for a commercial environment. It has a steam adjustment knob, which is normally found on your commercial units. That allows you to control the steam level of steam coming out, so if you want higher output or lower output, you can control that. Especially on a bed bug job, you don’t want to blow the bed bugs all over the place. So it allows you to get better control. It has over 50 different attachments to it, making every application capable. We like to use more of a triangular attachment. It even has another bed bug attachment, more like a hammerhead attachment. It also has more of a single jet nozzle, which we’ll go into later on in the video.

Operating it, the machine is very simple. Basically, it’s a continuous model. What that means is you have a regular tank here, and it injects into the boiler. When you’re doing a bed bug job, and you have a larger job to do; you don’t have to wait for it to cool down before you refill the unit. You essentially have one tank that injects into the other one so you can continue to steam perpetually, without having to wait for it to cool down. So normally, your higher end machines will have that feature for it. A steam pressure dial is right here. This basically shows you where you’re at with your pressure. Every time you pull the trigger, of course it will come down, and it’ll gradually work its way back up as the boiler is heating the water inside the container back up.

When using it for a professional bed bug job, this piece back here, the basket as well as the handles, you can remove this if you’d like by removing the screws. That makes it easier to keep in the back of a truck or a car. You can use this handle here to carry it around. It’s about 45 pounds, we found when we fill it up with water. It’s not too difficult to carry around, but it is of course a heavier model because it has more of a capacity of water that it holds on to. The casters are heavy duty, these are commercial. The case is made of metal, so it’s very durable, especially if you’re transporting it from room to room as opposed to a plastic unit. It’s less likely to be damaged, and it protects the interior components to it. Given it’s also a commercial model, it’s one of the first units out there that is operated by a computer. For example, when you’re running out of water, an alarm goes off that tells you that you’re low on water. It’s very well managed when it comes to doing a steam job, as well as very simple to operate. You just push the power button here, handle the steam adjustment knob here, so this unit basically does everything by itself.

With different commercial units out there, we found that if the fuse switch ever blows, it’s normally inside of the unit. You’d essentially have to package it back up and mail it back to the manufacturer. This one really has a nice feature in that if it ever happens to you, you can use the switch back here; just press it and it allows you to reset the fuse switch without having to mail it back to the manufacturer, which is a very very nice feature. The unit has a lifetime warranty to back up the unit, which is nice. It shows you the quality of the components. It also has a CEME solenoid to it. Usually when you pull the trigger on a non-commercial unit, it has a mechanical switch inside of the trigger, which allows the steam to come in and out. The only problem with that is, if you pull the trigger and let go of it, the steam inside of the hose turns back into water, and you have to purge the unit. With your higher end machines, including the Forza here, you pull the trigger and it actually has an electronic switch that engages the steam to come out of the unit, as opposed to a switch on the handle. So you get good dry hot steam without the steam usually turning back to water as you pull the trigger. It’s a lot dryer, it’s a lot hotter; you have 90 PSI and 270 temperature, allowing you to fill in those cracks and crevices with heat, and to do a bed bug job much more quickly and much more effectively than a lower PSI and tip temperature. We’re gonna show you some applications of how to use the machine, show you a few of the attachments, and show you how to use this commercial unit to do a bed bug job the right way.

Okay, before we show you what to do with a steamer, I want to show you what not to do first. These are some of the more common mistakes people do when they use a steamer for bed bugs. A lot of people just take the single-nozzle jet attachment, put it on the end here, and pull the trigger. All you’re going to do if you use this single-nozzle jet like that is blow them all over the place. What you want to have is good hot dry steam at the end of the tip that will keep the bed bugs stationary, but get them at the adequate temperature to kill them. So if you use something like this, some people will take the steam knob, turn it all the way up, pull the trigger, and then call us and say, “Oh my gosh, it’s just blowing out cold steam.” If you use the right attachments, like this one that is actually labeled for bed bugs – I took one of the included cloths and put it at the end – turn the steam adjustment down, usually about halfway, when you pull the trigger, you have very little force whatsoever. Within about maybe three to four inches from the tip, it gets incredibly hot (usually between 270 to 280 degrees); it’ll easily kill bed bugs, fill in those cracks and crevices, and actually do a bed bug job properly. Just make sure that when you’re doing a job, that you turn the steam adjustment knob down. When you’re doing tile and grout, you want to use a single-nozzle jet and the right attachments, but for bed bugs, you want to have less pressure coming out and good hot dry steam to kill bed bugs fast.

Now I’m going to show you how to do a sofa properly using the Forza. As an example, I went ahead and took off the main cushion here. When you’re doing the cushions, you want to make sure you’re moving very slowly. In any kind of application, a good rule of thumb is to move at one inch per second. Good hotspots on the cushions would be zippers; as you can see here, there’s a zipper cover. You want to go very slowly around the cushions and hit all of the little sewing seams and cracks where bed bugs might be. Hit those first, put the cushions off to the side, then you want to hit along the base of the sofa, then flip it upside down. Normally, there’s a dust cover held on by staples. Go ahead and remove that; it’s more for aesthetics anyways. Remove the dust cover, get down below the sofa, and hit every single crevice that you can think of as you’re doing the sofa with the Forza. I’m going to show you a great example of where bed bugs might be: at the base corner of the sofa, you see a nice crevice here where bed bugs might be. When you use a steamer, especially one with this kind of tip temperature, you’ll see steam shooting from the left and right hand sides of the bed bug fabric tool. When you pull the trigger, you want to fill in the crevices here, so essentially go across and move about one inch per second; it’s going to fill in all of those crevices. You can see steam all the way down here, and it’s super hot. You’re going to work your way down all the way across. Do that in every corner, crack, and crevice along the sofa, and really take your time, so that if there are bed bugs even down here deep inside, it’s going to kill all of them very quickly. Again, the steam adjustment knob is about halfway, so that you don’t blow them all over the place. If you’re using the right attachment, you get much better control. Now work your way all the way across. Every sofa is different, but you kind of get the idea of how to do the job properly. It’s a great contact killer; you’re just using water to kill bed bugs.

I’m going to show you now how to do small cracks and crevices. We won’t be able to use the bed bug fabric attachment. As I showed you earlier in the video, you have to use the single-nozzle jet attachment properly. We normally like to take a microfiber toweling. You can find this in any kind of Walmart, or use any kind of hand towel you might have around the house. This will help break up some of the pressure, and also absorbs some moisture coming out of the tip. Take a couple of rubber bands here and place them over the end as we can see here. What’s going to happen now is we’re going to turn the steam adjustment knob all the way down to break up the pressure and have good hot dry steam coming out. As you can see here, along the doorframe, there’s very large crevices where bed bugs might be hiding. We’re going to go ahead and move at about one inch per second, and move very slowly down the frame. You’ll have good hot dry steam going in and filling in those cracks, crevices, and voids, and kill any bed bugs that might be around. A better hot spot is down at the bottom of the doorframe; this is about a half an inch. Get in there, move very slowly. If you do it properly, you’ll actually see steam coming out of different crevices of the doorframe as it’s filling in all of the voids.

That concludes our example, so if you have any questions about the steamer and how it operates, you can reach us 7 days a week at www.bedbugsupply.com.

Posted in Reviews MM Novato on | Leave a comment