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MM Novato FAQ

Bed bugs are hard to kill. Have you ever sprayed a can of pesticide on a bed bug only to see it crawl away unaffected? Millions of people have experienced the same feeling of helplessness after seeing that. What is it about bed bugs that makes them so impervious to certain pesticides? Let’s take a […]

FAQ: How Bed Bugs Resist Chemicals

How bed bugs resist chemicalsBed bugs are hard to kill. Have you ever sprayed a can of pesticide on a bed bug only to see it crawl away unaffected? Millions of people have experienced the same feeling of helplessness after seeing that. What is it about bed bugs that makes them so impervious to certain pesticides? Let’s take a closer look and dig into how bed bugs resist chemicals.

The Rise and Fall of DDT

The timeline of bed bug resistance starts almost a century ago. During and after World War II, DDT became the insecticide of choice to deal with bed bug infestations. DDT was a powerful organophosphate that proved lethal to bed bugs of all ages and strains for many years. It’s credited with the near eradication of bed bugs in North America and most of Europe for decades.

Despite its infamous potency, not every bed bug exposed to DDT succumbed to it. Bed bugs have a short lifespan and can start breeding only weeks after birth. This allows them to mutate in an attempt to survive environmental changes. Some bed bugs that encountered DDT had mutations that allowed them to resist its toxins.

DDT likely wiped out all but the most resistant strains of bed bugs. The survivors were the ones that mutated and can completely resist chemicals like DDT. Their offspring then thrived with those powerful resistant properties intact.

After the US banned DDT use in the 1970s, the pest control industry moved on to weaker alternatives. By then, bed bugs had the genetic tools in place to build resistance to almost any synthetic insecticide they ran into. Modern bed bugs can secrete chemicals that digest poisons on their shell, rendering them harmless. They can even flush toxins from their internal organs using sophisticated biological pumps.

The New Bed Bug Resistance Toolbox

After decades of absence, bed bugs returned to the US in force over the last few years. It’s believed that all these modern bed bugs are completely resistant to DDT. The majority of active strains are also showing resistance to many modern pyrethroids. These insecticides had gained mainstream popularity in recent years, but we’ll need to address these new bed bugs in new ways.

The first key to dealing with the modern bed bug epidemic is understanding how bed bugs resist chemicals. That way, we can know how to wipe them out again. Researchers from Washington State University and the University of Kentucky stepped up to the plate. They conducted a four-year study that identified 14 unique bed bug genes. These genes appear to work to repel pyrethroids in common use today.

“Every living thing on Earth has a unique set of strategies to adapt to life-threatening situations in the environment,” said Zhu, the leader of the study. “The surprise discovery we never expected is that most of the genes responsible for the pesticide resistance in the bed bug are active in its outer skin-like shell or cuticle. This is the unique adaptation that has not been discovered in cockroaches, termites, ants, or other insects.”

The study’s co-author, University of Kentucky’s Subba Palli, believes that the solution lies in using RNA to interfere with these unique genetic functions. In laboratory settings, RNA strands can be injected directly into a bed bug. But this isn’t as simple a task with wild populations. We would need to develop a technology that can inject the RNA strands in a less direct way. Another option would be to alter a bed bug’s existing RNA to perform the same interference. “If someone solves that, I think we could have a really good product,” said Palli.

In the field, pest controllers are seeing pyrethroid resistance develop during treatments. When exposed to a single insecticide, infestations can begin showing resistance in just a couple of generations. Since bed bugs can hatch and mature in just three weeks, the timeline for resistance to show is very short.

Avoiding Bed Bug Resistance During Treatment

When addressing how bed bugs resist chemicals, there are two forms of resistance you’ll need to consider for your home treatment. The first is evolutionary resistance, which developed over decades. This long-term change has made certain chemicals ineffective for practical treatment. The other concern is short-term mutations, which can impact your follow-up treatments.

The first step is to make sure you’re not relying on a single chemical product to treat your home for bed bugs. Not only is it likely that the bed bugs in your home will resist chemicals they’re exposed to repeatedly, but it’s incredibly unlikely that you would be successful either way. Modern bed bug treatment strategies, like our 4-step solution, combine both chemical and non-chemical methods of attack. It’s also recommended that you use multiple contact and residual sprays to ensure that the infestation can’t mutate to resist chemicals they’ve been exposed to.

Just a few years ago, there was a wide range of chemical compounds on the market that were proven to kill bed bugs, either on contact or over time. Over the years, bed bug strains have developed resistances to many of these compounds, and those products are no longer as effective. To cut their losses in the development of these compounds, the manufacturers started selling to hardware stores and supermarkets at a discounted price.

Since these off-the-shelf sprays may not be able to curb your bed bug population, don’t use them! Instead, opt for newer contact and residual sprays that are effective against all strains of bed bugs. They may cost a bit more, but you will have peace of mind knowing that what you are applying is doing the job. We only carry the newest products with no known bed bug resistance.

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FAQ: What attracts bed bugs? (And how we can use that against them)

What attracts bed bugs to you?

Despite their prevalence in recent years, most people are either uninformed or misinformed about bed bugs. They often don’t know where bed bugs can be found, how they spread, and how to treat infestations. As in most things in life, educating yourself on bed bugs is the first step to dealing with them. What are bed bugs? Where do they come from? What attracts bed bugs to human hosts? And how can we use that attraction as part of a bed bug treatment?

Science of bed bug attraction

Dr. Michael Z. Levy, Penn Medicine

Bed bugs are believed to have evolved alongside humans, emerging from caves after the Ice Age and following us into modern civilization. However, they work in much simpler ways than humans do. They emit pheromones to signal to other bed bugs when they’re in danger or when they want to meet up to mate. Outside of those basic social needs, bed bugs generally run on a simple loop of eating, digesting, and sleeping.

While they spend most of their day hiding in the dark and digesting their last meal, at some point a bed bug needs to venture out in search of a meal. Since they only feed on blood, that means they’re looking for a sleeping person to feed on. Since they’re not agile and have terrible vision, they have pretty limited tools to “hunt” for their food source. So how do they manage to find us in our beds?

Contrary to popular belief, bed bugs don’t live exclusively in your bed. While there could be plenty of bugs in the seams of your mattress, or in the joints and corners of your bed frame, they could just as likely be hiding elsewhere in your room. They rely on chemical signals to find their host, like a chemical radar that gives them a sense of direction and proximity until they hit pay dirt: your exposed skin and the nourishing blood flowing under the surface.

So what are these chemical lures that are drawing bed bugs to you? The main two are quite simple: carbon dioxide and heat radiation. While you sleep, you’re breathing and emiting carbon dioxide at a much higher rate than what already exists in the air around you. You’re also constantly emiting heat, which makes you a giant target to a small bug that’s sensitive to heat signals.

The other chemicals that attracts bed bugs are much more subtle in their nature. Kairomones like octenol, lactic acid, and other organic acids can draw bed bugs to sleeping humans. We emit these chemicals in trace amounts through our breath and sweat, even while we sleep. While these mild chemicals are a much weaker signal than our body heat, they still contribute to a bed bug’s ability to find us and start chowing down.

Attracting and trapping bed bugs

NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor

So now that we know what attracts bed bugs, how can we put that knowledge to use? For starters, knowing how bed bugs actually find us can put to rest some of the less effective ideas people might have about bed bug treatments. For example, we know now that throwing away our mattress and sleeping on the floor isn’t a good idea. Bed bugs can be hiding elsewhere in the room, and we’ve done nothing to address their ability to reach you. We also can’t simply get up and move to an adjacent room, since we’d be bringing our body heat and chemical emissions with us.

Thanks to lab research that has identified what most effectively attracts bed bugs, pest control professionals have been able to develop bed bug traps and monitors that can imitate the lures that draw bed bugs to humans. These innovative tools are called active monitors because they use active lures to attract and catch bed bugs. Active monitors might use electric heat radiation, slow-release carbon dioxide, or chemical lures to bring nearby bed bugs out of hiding. Some products, like the NightWatch, even combine all three types of lures to increase their effectiveness.

Using bed bug traps in your treatment

ClimbUp Interceptors

Both active and passive (non-active) monitors can be included in your bed bug treatment. Deciding which type of monitor to use depends on your specific situation. If you’re trying to determine whether bed bugs are in an unoccupied room, you’ll want to use an active monitor that attracts bed bugs and lures them out of hiding. You’d also need an active monitor to treat vacant rooms, since otherwise the bed bugs would stay in hiding and may not be exposed to the eradication methods you’ve deployed.

However, active bed bug monitors aren’t going to be the right choice all the time. If you’re dealing with an infestation in a room that someone’s sleeping in, then you shouldn’t use an active monitor in that room. The sleeping host is a much larger and stronger lure that more effectively attracts bed bugs than any monitor can – there’s simply too much heat, carbon dioxide, and chemical odor coming off of a human body for a smaller lure to compete.

In the case of an occupied space, we can actually weaponize that sleeping host and use their luring effect for our treatment. By completely treating the bed first, then isolating it with passive traps like ClimbUp Interceptors, we can create a bed bug-proof bed for the occupant to safely continue sleeping in. When we apply residual sprays and powders to the area, the sleeping host will draw the bed bugs out of hiding so that they come in contact with the chemicals. We’ll also be able to inspect the passive traps on a regular basis to get a gauge of the population. If fewer and fewer bugs are caught in the ClimbUps, we know that the treatment is effective and that we’re closer to complete eradication.

Bed Bug Supply’s recommended treatment process incorporates the science of what attracts bed bugs. Whether you’re using a ClimbUp in a vacant room or treating and isolating a bed in an occupied room, being able to safely lure bed bugs out of hiding is a critical step in treating them. That’s why the first two steps of our four-step solution are dedicated to treating your bed, encasing your mattress and box spring, and installing passive bed bug monitors so that the bed is completely isolated. With our sleeping human lure in place, the bed bugs in the room will come out thinking they’re getting a free meal. In reality, they’ll be getting their just deserts.

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MM Novato Reviews

Pest control manufacturers have waged war against bed bugs for over a century. From the early days of tobacco leaves and organophosphates to the dual-action formulas of today, the arms race rages on. Since bed bugs have evolved to resist traditional chemicals, developers have had to stay on their toes with the latest and greatest […]

Bedlam vs Bedlam Plus: Heavyweight Bed Bug Sprays Compared

Bedlam vs Bedlam Plus

Pest control manufacturers have waged war against bed bugs for over a century. From the early days of tobacco leaves and organophosphates to the dual-action formulas of today, the arms race rages on. Since bed bugs have evolved to resist traditional chemicals, developers have had to stay on their toes with the latest and greatest treatment methods.

One of the foremost leaders in bed bug control is MGK. The company was founded at the beginning of the 20th century, and has been a modern innovator in bed bug research. They were the first to develop a product specifically designed for bed bugs: Bedlam. A few years later, they followed up with Bedlam Plus, the first product designed for resistant strains of bed bugs. But how do the two solutions compare? Which is right for you? Let’s take a closer look and find out:

Dual-Action Bed Bug Sprays

Bedlam Bed Bug SprayWhen commercial pesticides first appeared around World War II, we treated for bed bugs using organochlorines such as DDT. Organochlorines were organic compounds that attacked the peripheral nervous system, keeping sodium channels open after activation to cause paralysis and death. This mode of action became the standard for pesticide development in the decades to follow.

But bed bugs wouldn’t be stopped by DDT forever. Thanks to their uncanny ability to build resistant to pesticides, bed bugs quickly evolved to shrug off DDT along with its competitors. Now that bed bugs have resurged in population and spread all over the Western world, pesticide manufacturers have had to go back to the drawing board to come up with a modern solution.

In 2006, MGK introduced the first pest control product specifically designed for bed bugs. Bedlam was also the first to employ a dual-action aerosol formula to provide a quick knockdown and a long-lasting residual killer. This resulted in a solution that killed 85% of exposed bed bugs within a minute of the application and killed 98% of the remaining bugs over the next two weeks.

Bedlam and Bed Bug Resistance

Bedlam Plus Bed Bug SprayBed bugs are notoriously hard to kill. Worse yet, they’re difficult to treat on a larger-than-individual scale, whether we’re talking about a bedroom or a continent. Just as bed bugs have grown resistant to DDT since its US ban in the 70s, so too have their genetic detox tools been used to address more modern methods of attack.

At the time of its release, Bedlam was the most effective version of a pesticide class called pyrethroids. Pyrethroids are synthetic derivatives of the naturally-occurring compound pyrethrin, which attacks bugs’ sodium channels in a different way than the organochlorines of the early 20th century did. While Bedlam doesn’t rely on a pyrethroid to do all of its killing (it is a dual-action formula, after all), that pyrethroid is a big part of what makes its knockdown work.

Today, researchers have identified widespread strains of bed bugs that have developed an innate resistance to pyrethroid chemicals. These unique genes allow resistant bed bugs to secrete chemicals on their shell, digesting the pyrethroid compound before it gets a chance to enter the bug’s bloodstream. These pyrethroid-resistant bed bug strains now make up the majority of the Western population encountered today.

To combat this newly resistant threat, MGK went back to work on developing a compound that would effectively neutralize any bed bug infestation. In 2012, they released the fruits of their labor: Bedlam Plus. This unique formula combines the same proven dual-action formula seen in Bedlam with a unique synergist that counters the resistance method that bed bugs use to protect against pyrethroids. The synergist proved effective, as Bedlam Plus was able to achieve a 100% kill rate on all of the most common strains of resistant bed bugs.

Which is Right For You?

Both Bedlam and Bedlam Plus are in active use in the field today. They both offer an easy to use, water-based foaming compound that combines a fast knockdown with long-lasting residual control. Their broad labels allow flexible use throughout a bedroom or other indoor area, and their low odor, non-staining solution is generally safe wherever water would be.

The odds of bed bugs in your home being resistant to pyrethroids is very high, with estimates of resistant strains making up as much as 85% of the Western population today. While both products are likely to cut down on your infestation’s population and activity immediately after use, only Bedlam Plus can ensure that resistant bed bugs will die as well. Nonetheless, neither product should be used to treat bed bugs on their own, and when combined with other products to form a complete bed bug treatment solution, both Bedlam and Bedlam Plus will do their job well.

Bedlam

Bedlam controls Bed Bugs, Dust Mites,Fleas, Lice and Ticks by killing on contact and providing lasting residual performance. Bedlam is labeled for use in the toughest hiding places. As a water-based product, it won’t stain water-safe fabrics. Bedlam works for the most demanding jobs. You can rest assured.
Starting at:

$16.95
Bedlam

Bedlam Plus

Bedlam Plus features a dual mode of action that kills the toughest pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs fast. Featuring the perfect combination of quick kill and residual control, Bedlam Plus is proven to keep killing pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs and their eggs for two weeks after treatment.
Starting at:

$18.65
Bedlam Plus
Posted in Reviews MM Novato on | Leave a comment

MM Novato Reviews

When you first discover that you have bed bugs, your first reaction (besides “why is this happening to me”) is probably to find something to kill the invaders with. For many people, the weapon of choice would be a modern, effective bed bug spray. While some resort to cheap hardware-store sprays, savvy consumers are starting […]

Bedlam Plus Review: Heavyweight Residual Bed Bug Spray

When you first discover that you have bed bugs, your first reaction (besides “why is this happening to me”) is probably to find something to kill the invaders with. For many people, the weapon of choice would be a modern, effective bed bug spray. While some resort to cheap hardware-store sprays, savvy consumers are starting to keep an eye on what hired professionals use. For the past few years, that go-to professional spray has been Bedlam Plus.

Bedlam Plus is MGK’s latest iteration on the successful Bedlam formula. This newest generation of bed bug killer acts faster and works on bed bugs that have grown resistant to other insecticides. But is it the right tool for your home infestation? Let’s take a closer look and find out:

Evolving Bed Bugs and Bed Bug Sprays

DDT bed bug sprayThroughout most of the 20th century, the Western world combatted bed bugs with DDT and organophosphates. These were simple neurotoxins that disrupted the normal nerve signals in bed bugs and other target pests. Unfortunately, they also turned out to be extremely dangerous for both humans and the local environment. To make matters worse, bed bugs began evolving to resist conventional insecticides. By the time DDT was banned from use in the United States, the surviving bed bugs were completely resistant to it.

The environmental impact of DDT and the growing resistance to it forced researchers to investigate other options. In the 1970s, researchers deconstructed the pyrethrins produced by the chrysanthemum flower. This resulted in synthetic variants called pyrethroids. Pyrethroids kill bed bugs and other insects by keeping open sodium channels in their nerves, resulting in death by paralysis. Unfortunately, bed bugs began developing resistances to that method of attack as well. Today, those resistant strains make up the vast majority of the bed bug population.

Dual-Action Formula

Now that bed bugs are commonly resistant to both traditional organophosphates and contemporary pyrethroids, insecticide developers are coming up with new ways to treat infestations. The latest generation of bed bug spray formulas now feature dual-action compounds. These combine fast-acting pyrethroids with a longer-lasting residual control method. To ensure that the pyrethroids are effective against resistant bed bugs, some products include a synergist that prevents those methods of resistance.

That’s where Bedlam came in. The first bed bug spray specifically labeled for bed bugs was also the first to use a synergist to combat pyrethroid resistance. By combining the pyrethroid phenothrin with a proprietary synergist, Bedlam ensures that bed bugs can’t metabolize the chemical before it takes effect. Bedlam Plus builds on the success of this formula by adding a long-lasting neonicotinoid. Imidacloprid can stay effective for up to two weeks, long after the sprayed material dries.

The resulting combination is a fast knockdown and brutally effective residual control. In testing, Bedlam Plus killed over 10 times as many bed bugs within four hours as the leading spray at the time of its invention. After 72 hours of exposure, over 90% of the test bed bug population were dead. That’s a critical improvement over the 70-80% mortality rate that other residuals produced in that time.

Using Bedlam Plus

Applying bed bug spray to carpet edge

Bedlam Plus ships in a convenient, easy-to-use aerosol can. It won’t stain water-safe fabrics and surfaces, but you should still test by spraying in an inconspicuous area and checking for possible staining or discoloration. Once that’s done, you can start your treatment of the infested area.

Bedlam Plus is labeled for use on critical areas where bed bugs hide indoors: mattresses, box springs, headboards, walls, floors, and baseboards. It’s safe for use on wood, carpet, upholstery, and other water-safe fabrics. Just shake the can well before each use and make sure the area is vacated of other people and animals.

To use Bedlam Plus effectively, remove the sheets and pillows from your bed and spray along the seams and edges of the mattress, box spring, and bed frame, including the headboard. Then spray along the cracks and crevices along the walls, floors, and baseboards. The included straw applicator will help with getting deep into those spaces.

There’s good reason why Bedlam Plus has become one of the go-to tools in pest management pros’ toolbox: it’s a fast and effective bed bug killer with a reliable 14-day residual that works on surfaces throughout the home. However, it can’t do the job on its own.

What makes a bed bug treatment effective is not just which bed bug sprays you use, but also which other treatment methods you combine with those sprays. Bed bug treatments are complicated because bed bugs are so hard to wipe out. Every product we recommend, including Bedlam Plus, needs to be part of a complete and holistic treatment system. If you’re following our proven 4-step solution, Bedlam Plus is a critical component.

Bedlam Plus

Bedlam Plus features a dual mode of action that kills the toughest pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs fast. Featuring the perfect combination of quick kill and residual control, Bedlam Plus is proven to keep killing pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs and their eggs for two weeks after treatment.
Starting at:

$18.65
Bedlam Plus
Posted in Reviews MM Novato on | Leave a comment

MM Novato Reviews

Bed bugs have been a plague over the last 10 years. Part of the reason for their resurgence is their resistance to the chemicals that used to keep them at bay. Now that they’re back, insecticide developers have worked day and night on new ways to combat them. As a result, we have more options […]

Bedlam Plus vs Temprid Ready-to-Spray

Bedlam Plus vs Temprid Ready-to-Spray

Bed bugs have been a plague over the last 10 years. Part of the reason for their resurgence is their resistance to the chemicals that used to keep them at bay. Now that they’re back, insecticide developers have worked day and night on new ways to combat them. As a result, we have more options than ever to kill bed bugs and make sure they don’t come back.

Two of the most common bed bug sprays you’ll see or hear about are Bedlam Plus and Temprid Ready-to-Spray. Developed around the same time, both sprays have become must-haves in the bed bug arsenal. But what sets these sprays apart? Which spray works best for your needs? Let’s take a closer look and find out.

Evolution of Dual-Mode Formulas

DDT spraying during World War II

DDT spraying during World War II. Credit: National Museum of Health and Medicine

In the past, bed bug eradication involved DDT and organophosphates. Both of these methods proved to be very dangerous for both humans and wildlife. To make matters worse, bed bugs developed resistances to these methods of attack. This lead to an arms race between pesticide developers and the bed bugs they were aiming to control.

In the 60s and 70s, scientists deconstructed the pyrethrins produced by the chrysanthemum flower. They developed synthetic alternatives called pyrethroids. These kill insects by keeping open sodium channels in their nerves, leading to paralysis and death. While this method proved effective against a wide range of pests, certain strains of bed bugs began developing a resistance to the attack. By metabolizing the pyrethroids before they reach the sodium channels, a resistant bed bug can break down the chemicals before they have any effect.

Modern bed bug research

Modern bed bug research. Credit: US Navy

The latest generation of insecticide combos now feature dual-action formulas. These combine a fast-acting pyrethroid with a long-lasting residual control method. Some products also include a synergist that enhances the insecticide effect or helps to prevent bed bugs from metabolizing the pyrethroid.

Bedlam Plus: The Go-To Standard


Bedlam Plus

Only a few years ago, pest control professionals had to kill bed bugs using sprays designed for other pests. That’s not to say the sprays weren’t effective — if they weren’t, the pros wouldn’t bother. But the growing resistance of bed bug strains to modern chemicals proved that manufacturers needed to target them directly.

MGK was the first to market with a product designed specifically for use against bed bugs: Bedlam. By combining the modern pyrethroid sumithrin with a synergist, Bedlam was able to achieve long-lasting residual control of even the latest pyrethroid-resistant strains of bed bugs. As you’d expect, it flew off the shelves.

Bedlam Plus is MGK’s latest iteration on the Bedlam formula. They took that same synergized pyrethroid and combined with it a long-lasting neonicotinoid. Imidacloprid can stay effective for up to two weeks, long after the sprayed material dries. Bedlam Plus was the first solution to offer a quick knockdown and a reliable long-term control.

Temprid Ready-to-Spray: The New Challenger


Temprid Ready-to-Spray

Temprid was at first targeted only to pest management professionals. The original concentrate, Temprid SC, was the first release of a new dual-action formula with a micro-encapsulated design. This allowed the residual effect to work even longer than other liquid concentrates.

The formula chosen for Temprid is similar to what Bedlam Plus pioneered. By combining the fast knockdown of beta-cyfluthrin with the systemic residual control of imidacloprid, Temprid makes sure that an infestation goes down and stays down.

Temprid Ready-to-Spray packs the proven performance of Temprid SC in a simple spray can. No more measuring and mixing — just shake up the can and you’re ready to go. The unique bag-on-valve technology uses no added solvents or propellants.


Which Bed Bug Spray for You?

Now that you’re all caught up on what these sprays do, you’re probably still wondering which is the best option for your needs. The good news is that you can’t go wrong: these are both proven, professional-strength bed bug sprays that get results on any strain of bed bug. They both feature modern, dual-action formulas and have flexible labels for indoor applications.

Both Bedlam Plus and Temprid Ready-to-Spray are low-odor, non-staining solutions. You can spray them on wood, carpet, upholstery, mattresses, and other fabrics. They were also both designed with pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs in mind.

So how do these two stand out from each other? One important detail is where they can legally be purchased and used. While Temprid Ready-to-Spray is legal in most states, it’s not registered for use indoors in New York. Meanwhile, Bedlam Plus is legal in all 50 states, though it’s an aerosol product and can’t be shipped to Alaska or Hawaii. Temprid Ready-to-Spray uses a bag-on-valve technology that makes it safe for air travel, so it’s cleared for takeoff to those states.

The other difference that is important for some cases is the residual effect. Bedlam Plus works effectively for up to two weeks, as long as the applied surface stays dry. But Temprid Ready-to-Spray can continue to kill bed bugs for up to six months, long after Bedlam Plus wears off. But this isn’t a factor worth sweating if you follow our recommended 4-step solution: we recommend re-applying your contact and residual sprays every two weeks at least three times. After three applications over a six-week period, there shouldn’t be any bed bugs left for Temprid to continue killing.

An effective bed bug treatment is all about choosing the right tools for the job. This not only means using effective bed bug sprays, but it means combining those sprays with other treatment methods. Bed bug treatments are more involved than other pests, due to the nature of bed bugs themselves.

None of our bed bug sprays will do the job on their own — if they could, that’s all we would sell. Every product we recommend needs to be part of a holistic treatment system, such as the one outlined in our proven 4-step solution.

Bedlam Plus

Bedlam Plus features a dual mode of action that kills the toughest pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs fast. Featuring the perfect combination of quick kill and residual control, Bedlam Plus is proven to keep killing pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs and their eggs for two weeks after treatment.
Starting at:

$18.65
Bedlam Plus

Temprid Ready-to-Spray

Temprid Ready-to-Spray combines the fast-acting, broad-spectrum control of beta-cyfluthrin with the systemic residual control of imidacloprid to provide premium performance and efficacy.
Starting at:

$17.95
Temprid Ready-to-Spray
Posted in Reviews MM Novato on | Leave a comment