MM Novato Treatments

The NightWatch bed bug monitor is the best way to monitor for bed bug activity in an unoccupied room. It’s the only active monitor on the market to combine three different luring mechanisms: heat, carbon dioxide, and a kairomone odor attractant. This effective professional tool is also very simple to set up and maintain through the monitoring job. Let’s go over how to put together a new NightWatch monitor and have it ready for action.

NightWatch CO2 bottle with brass fitting

The first thing you’ll need to do is fill up a CO2 bottle so it can be hooked up to the NightWatch. The bottle we carry is a 20-ounce aluminum bottle with a brass fitting. Other bottles will work as long as they have that brass fitting on top. Due to federal shipping regulations, we have to ship the bottle empty, so you’ll need to take it to a store that offers Co2 fill-ups, such as a paintball supply or sporting goods store.

The filled CO2 bottle needs to be screwed into the outlet in the rear of the NightWatch. Keep screwing it in clockwise until it locks in firmly to ensure the CO2 release system is fully pressurized. Once the bottle is installed, it’ll keep the NightWatch working for 2-4 days. The LCD display will show a “CO2” message when the bottle is empty.

NightWatch kairomone lure

The other lure that needs to be attached is the kairomone odor attractant. This will come in the form of a plastic cartridge with an opening on top covered by a label. Peel off that label so that the chemical odors can be released through the opening, then set the lure on top of the NightWatch’s radiator. Make sure to line up the round opening at the end of the lure so that it fits into place securely.

NightWatch pitfall trap

Finally, we can connect the pitfall traps to the side rails on either side of the unit. These pitfalls have textured ramps that bed bugs can climb up as they search for the source of the lures. The bugs will then fall into a smooth and slick plastic well that they can’t escape from. The operator will be able to check these pitfalls regularly for captured bed bugs.

Once everything is in place, we can attach the top cover and voila! Our NightWatch is assembled and ready to get to work. All that’s left to do now is find a good spot to place the NightWatch, plug it in, and set the clock.

The NightWatch is often used to monitor for bed bugs in unoccupied rooms. In that case, you’ll want to make sure that the heat and chemical attractants are distributed evenly throughout the room, so you should leave the NightWatch somewhere near the center of the room. If the room is furnished, place the NightWatch near the headboard of the bed. This will situate the trap closer to the bed bugs’ likely hiding places. Use an extension cord if you have to in order to reach the right spot.

Setting the NightWatch timer

Once you’ve found a place for the NightWatch and plugged it in, you’ll need to set the clock to the correct time so that it will turn on and off at night. The NightWatch is configured to run between 10 PM and 6 AM, which is when bed bugs are most active. To set the clock, simply use the “TIME SET” button below the LCD display until the time shown is correct. Press once on the button to move it forward one minute, and hold down the button to move the hours forward. Once you’ve done that, the NightWatch is ready to go!

NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor

When the NightWatch is running, you’ll hear some clicking and hissing sounds every few seconds. These are the sounds of the carbon dioxide being triggered and released. The carbon dioxide bottle will need to be refilled or replaced about every four days, and the kairomone lure will need to be replaced once a week. If you keep the lure running nightly and go two weeks without seeing any bed bugs in the NightWatch’s pitfall traps, you can safely declare the room bed bug free.

How to Set Up a NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor

The NightWatch bed bug monitor is the best way to monitor for bed bug activity in an unoccupied room. It’s the only active monitor on the market to combine three different luring mechanisms: heat, carbon dioxide, and a kairomone odor attractant. This effective professional tool is also very simple to set up and maintain through the monitoring job. Let’s go over how to put together a new NightWatch monitor and have it ready for action.

NightWatch CO2 bottle with brass fitting

The first thing you’ll need to do is fill up a CO2 bottle so it can be hooked up to the NightWatch. The bottle we carry is a 20-ounce aluminum bottle with a brass fitting. Other bottles will work as long as they have that brass fitting on top. Due to federal shipping regulations, we have to ship the bottle empty, so you’ll need to take it to a store that offers Co2 fill-ups, such as a paintball supply or sporting goods store.

The filled CO2 bottle needs to be screwed into the outlet in the rear of the NightWatch. Keep screwing it in clockwise until it locks in firmly to ensure the CO2 release system is fully pressurized. Once the bottle is installed, it’ll keep the NightWatch working for 2-4 days. The LCD display will show a “CO2” message when the bottle is empty.

NightWatch kairomone lure

The other lure that needs to be attached is the kairomone odor attractant. This will come in the form of a plastic cartridge with an opening on top covered by a label. Peel off that label so that the chemical odors can be released through the opening, then set the lure on top of the NightWatch’s radiator. Make sure to line up the round opening at the end of the lure so that it fits into place securely.

NightWatch pitfall trap

Finally, we can connect the pitfall traps to the side rails on either side of the unit. These pitfalls have textured ramps that bed bugs can climb up as they search for the source of the lures. The bugs will then fall into a smooth and slick plastic well that they can’t escape from. The operator will be able to check these pitfalls regularly for captured bed bugs.

Once everything is in place, we can attach the top cover and voila! Our NightWatch is assembled and ready to get to work. All that’s left to do now is find a good spot to place the NightWatch, plug it in, and set the clock.

The NightWatch is often used to monitor for bed bugs in unoccupied rooms. In that case, you’ll want to make sure that the heat and chemical attractants are distributed evenly throughout the room, so you should leave the NightWatch somewhere near the center of the room. If the room is furnished, place the NightWatch near the headboard of the bed. This will situate the trap closer to the bed bugs’ likely hiding places. Use an extension cord if you have to in order to reach the right spot.

Setting the NightWatch timer

Once you’ve found a place for the NightWatch and plugged it in, you’ll need to set the clock to the correct time so that it will turn on and off at night. The NightWatch is configured to run between 10 PM and 6 AM, which is when bed bugs are most active. To set the clock, simply use the “TIME SET” button below the LCD display until the time shown is correct. Press once on the button to move it forward one minute, and hold down the button to move the hours forward. Once you’ve done that, the NightWatch is ready to go!

NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor

When the NightWatch is running, you’ll hear some clicking and hissing sounds every few seconds. These are the sounds of the carbon dioxide being triggered and released. The carbon dioxide bottle will need to be refilled or replaced about every four days, and the kairomone lure will need to be replaced once a week. If you keep the lure running nightly and go two weeks without seeing any bed bugs in the NightWatch’s pitfall traps, you can safely declare the room bed bug free.

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