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MM Novato News

Whether or not you do bed bug inspections for a living, you can imagine how tough it can be to confirm whether or not bed bugs are in a room. Even if someone is reporting bites, that’s no guarantee – the bites could be from a different location, or they could be from something other […]

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NightWatch Active Monitor Now Featuring Kairomone Lures

NightWatch Bed Bug Monitor

Whether or not you do bed bug inspections for a living, you can imagine how tough it can be to confirm whether or not bed bugs are in a room. Even if someone is reporting bites, that’s no guarantee – the bites could be from a different location, or they could be from something other than a bed bug. Inspections take time, money, and special equipment, and still won’t be 100% accurate. Fortunately, the NightWatch active monitor makes inspections easy, and now features a powerful kairomone lure to make it even more effective.

NightWatch is a bed bug monitoring device that has been on the market for years now. It has always been extremely effective at determining whether or not bed bugs are active in a room, especially in a room that isn’t occupied by a sleeping person. Previously, the NightWatch used a combination of carbon dioxide and heat to mimic a sleeping host. By radiating heat and emitting a steady release of CO2, the NightWatch is able to draw bed bugs out and capture them in its pitfalls.

NightWatch Active Monitor with Kairomone Lure

To make the NightWatch even more effective (not that it needs it), BioSensory has added a kairomone chemical lure. This lure works in conjunction with the heat and carbon dioxide, mimicking the human scents that bed bugs have evolved to be sensitive to. BioSensory previously had a kairomone lure for the NightWatch, but regulatory setbacks have kept it off of the market for about a year now. Now, this unique host odor attractant is back on the market in full force, ready to enhance bed bug monitoring efforts everywhere.

One of the most common uses for the NightWatch is treating unoccupied rooms for bed bugs. Without a sleeping host, there is nothing to encourage bed bugs to leave their hiding places, so it’s not likely that they will come in contact with the insecticide sprays and powders that have been applied. The NightWatch mimics a sleeping person, drawing bed bugs out and causing them to cross the defenses that have been laid down. Therefore, without an active monitor like the NightWatch, bed bug treatments in unoccupied rooms may not be effective.

The NightWatch monitor has always been a favorite here at the Bed Bug Supply office. It’s extremely well constructed and easy to set up, and has been proven effective over the years. The reintroduction of the kairomone lure will be very popular with pest control operators and property managers that have come to depend on the NightWatch as part of their inspection routines. Instead of spending laborious hours searching all over a room for traces of bed bug activity, you can set up a NightWatch in five minutes and let it work for up to 7 nights before needing to refill the bottle or replace the lure cartridge. If you already own a NightWatch monitor, the kairomone lures can be used with your existing unit – you may purchase them in 4-packs here.

NightWatch Bed Bug Trap and Monitor (Includes FREE Kairomone Lures 4-Pack)

The NightWatch Is The Most Advanced Active Bed Bug Monitor On The Market Utilizing a Kairomone Lure, CO2 And Heat To Effectively Monitor And Trap Bed Bugs.
Our Price:$399.95
$349.95
NightWatch Bed Bug Trap and Monitor (Includes FREE Kairomone Lures 4-Pack)
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MM Novato FAQ

A common question we hear is whether or not bed bugs can be harmful to a person’s health. Some health concerns go as far as fear of one’s life. But can a bed bug infestation really result in death? Let’s explore the facts and the possibilities: First off, while bed bug bites are a nuisance, and […]

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FAQ: Can Bed Bugs Kill You?

Bed Bug KillerA common question we hear is whether or not bed bugs can be harmful to a person’s health. Some health concerns go as far as fear of one’s life. But can a bed bug infestation really result in death? Let’s explore the facts and the possibilities:

First off, while bed bug bites are a nuisance, and they often result in itching and burning, they are not known to transmit disease or pose any serious health risks. Of course, this could be proven wrong in the future, as we know very little about bed bugs at this time. The most common health issues associated with bed bugs are sleep deprivation, insomnia, and stress, which can sometimes be severe enough to result in post-traumatic stress disorder after experiencing an infestation.

Unfortunately, some cases of bed bug infestations can result in injury. This is usually a result of improper treatment attempts, either by the resident or by a pest control operator. Overexposure to any pesticide can be harmful, and can be made even worse by poor ventilation or by pre-existing health conditions. Injuries and poisonings are an important reminder that you must always follow the product label and MSDS whenever you are using an insecticide.

According to a CDC report published in 2011, there has only been one death attributed to a bed bug infestation. In 2010, an elderly North Carolina couple attempted to treat a bed bug problem in their home. First, they sprayed their baseboards, walls, and bed with two insecticides, neither of which were registered for use against bed bugs. Later that day, they released nine cans of insecticide fogger.

A couple of days later, they resprayed around the bed and released another nine cans of fogger. In addition to that second treatment attempt, the woman sprayed her arms, chest, and hair with a flea insecticide, and covered her hair with a shower cap to keep the insecticide there. Shortly after, the woman was taken to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead. She was 65 years old, and had a lengthy history of pre-existing medical conditions, including kidney failure, heart attack, diabetes, hypertension, and depression. She was taking at least 10 medications at the time of exposure, according to the report.

This case is a tragic example of people panicking and taking drastic action against a bed bug infestation without doing the proper research and without following the instructions on the products they used. Bed bugs are certainly stressful to deal with, but it’s extremely important to stay calm and take all necessary precautions, especially when handling insecticides.

Other mishandlings of insecticides mentioned in the report (and attributed to injuries and poisonings) included mass quantities of insect repellent, as well as use of agricultural and outdoor pesticides inside a house.

If you’re in the mood for some light reading, the 2,000-word CDC report can be found here.

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MM Novato Treatments

Supermarkets and hardware stores: love them or hate them, these stores are everywhere. You can often find huge aisles dedicated to pest control products here, which treat all types of different insects, including bees, ants, roaches, and mosquitoes. While they often cost less than $7 per spray, and do seem convenient, this may not be […]

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Say no to cheap store-bought bed bug sprays

Say NO to cheap bed bug sprays

Supermarkets and hardware stores: love them or hate them, these stores are everywhere. You can often find huge aisles dedicated to pest control products here, which treat all types of different insects, including bees, ants, roaches, and mosquitoes. While they often cost less than $7 per spray, and do seem convenient, this may not be the best place to purchase your bed bug sprays and powders.

Outdated Formulations

Bed bug sprays found in local hardware stores and supermarkets mainly consist of outdated pesticide formulas. These were once very popular among pest control professionals, but have since lost much of their effectiveness due to how rapidly bed bugs can build resistance to toxins that they’re exposed to.

Since chemical companies invested so much research and development into each formula, they don’t want to completely scrap a less effective formula in place of a newer one. Instead, they often sell these products directly to consumer-based retailers at a value price. This is why most people who attempt a bed bug treatment themselves using these inexpensive  store-bought “bed bug sprays” often fail.

Fortunately, you can find the same sprays and powders that professionals use by shopping online or by searching for niche pest supply stores. These sources provide anyone with the ability to tackle an infestation by following an integrated pest management approach, including the use of encasements, steamers, and monitors.

However, professional sprays can cost considerably more than inexpensive and outdated sprays found in local stores. This is because chemical companies like to recoup much of their R&D expenses in the first few years of a new formula’s launch, bringing the cost up for professional formulations that haven’t yet encountered resistance. Although more expensive, it’s a small price to pay for a much greater chance that your bed bug treatment will succeed.

Bug Bombs and Foggers

When most homeowners encounter a pest problem, they reach for one of many popular “bug bombs” or “foggers“. Unfortunately, these bombs have been found to be largely ineffective against bed bugs: an Ohio State University study showed that most major bug bomb brands have a very poor success rate in killing bed bugs.

This is due to how the insecticide in a bug bomb reaches its target. Bug bombs work by filling an open space with insecticide gas, killing insects that inhale it. This may work for bugs that spend most of their time in open terrain, but bed bugs are much less often found in open space – they prefer to tuck away in tight spaces where they won’t be disturbed between meals. A gas that isn’t directly injected into these areas isn’t going to penetrate effectively, meaning your bed bugs might be out of the chemicals’ range.

In order to kill bed bugs, an insecticide needs to be applied where they are most likely to be active. Contact sprays that are applied to beds and furniture are likely to cut down the population, while residual sprays and powders can be laid down on cracks and crevices throughout a room to kill bed bugs that come out of their hiding places.

Unregistered or “Exempt” Sprays

Be wary of store-bought bed bug sprays claiming to be all-natural or EPA “exempt”. Ingredients that are outside of the jurisdiction of the EPA usually have no insecticidal properties, and are often not fully tested; this means that they could have no effect at all against bed bugs. This is why Bed Bug Supply only carries EPA-certified bed bug sprays, which have been fully tested to ensure that they will work as intended.

Despite the occasional FTC action against deceptive advertisers, there’s little stopping EPA exempt spray companies from selling you a cheap bed bug solution that they promise will work, despite the product never going through any certification or lab trials. These products are commonly made from natural oils, claiming to be an environmentally friendly alternative to “harmful pesticides”. When a product is EPA exempt, it’s normally because the ingredients used are not actually insecticides, and are often never tested against bed bugs in a scientific environment.

Can cedar oil kill bed bugs? Sometimes, yes. But so can alcohol. Or your shoe. When you buy professional-strength products, you’re not just getting something that can kill bed bugs – you’re getting something that kills most, if not all of them. Cutting down a small portion of an infestation does nothing; to solve the problem, you need to eliminate the population completely. That’s what our professional-strength treatment process is for.

Unfortunately, there are no cheap and easy shortcuts with bed bugs. Your supermarket doesn’t have the solution for your bed bug infestation. Bed bugs are a tough foe to conquer, and you need a professional-strength, professionally proven solution using multiple products and techniques.

Get rid of bed bugs like the pros with our professional-strength powders and sprays. All of our sprays and powders are EPA registered and include free shipping.
Starting at:
$9.95
Professional Bed Bug Kits
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MM Novato FAQ

A lot of customers have expressed curiosity in the growth and development of bed bugs. They sometimes have difficulty determining if a pest they find is a young bed bug or some other bug species. Bed bug education isn’t as common as it should be; with the rate of infestation as high as it is […]

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All about the bed bug life cycle

Bed bug life stages

A lot of customers have expressed curiosity in the growth and development of bed bugs. They sometimes have difficulty determining if a pest they find is a young bed bug or some other bug species. Bed bug education isn’t as common as it should be; with the rate of infestation as high as it is today, people should be learning as much as they can about bed bugs. Learn about every stage in the unique bed bug life cycle, from the eggs hatching all the way to a hungry adult:

Bed bug eggs

The bed bug life cycle starts with an egg. It is milky white in color, and about a millimeter long, resembling a grain of rice. Pregnant females lay three or four eggs per day (though sometimes as much as five), and up to 500 eggs can be laid in her lifetime. This high volume of eggs can allow a single pregnant bed bug to form a large infestation on her own.

Bed bug nymph feeding

The eggs hatch within two weeks, and nymphs emerge. The smallest nymphs are a light yellow color and almost transparent. Anatomically, they look like very small adult bed bugs, and can even feature those fine hairs that are a characteristic of the species. To mature, nymphs must feed and pass through five molting stages. They molt in a process called ecdysis, which is just a fancy term for the way that many invertebrates shed their exoskeleton to make room for growth or to regenerate damaged tissue.

Bed bug molting an exoskeleton

Nymphs must have a blood meal before they can progress to the next molting stage. Each molting stage is called an instar, and with each instar the young bed bug grows larger and takes on a darker brown-red color. In ideal development conditions, where the temperature is mildly cool and a human host is present, a nymph can feed weekly and mature within five weeks, quickly progressing through all four instars.

Bed bug life cycle

After reaching maturity, adult bed bugs typically continue to feed weekly. An adult is reddish-brown in color, and is about five millimeters long, or roughly the size of an apple seed. As they feed, their abdomen extends to accommodate their blood meal. After feeding, they scurry off to their hiding places to digest their meal, seek a mate, or rest.

Bed bug feeding

Most bed bugs live for four to six months, though some can live for over a year without food by hibernating. During that short lifetime, the average bed bug fathers a family of over five generations, each spanning possibly hundreds of inbreeding bugs! This shocking rate of population expansion makes it easy to see how an infestation can get out of hand so quickly, and gives a clue to how bed bugs can spread so quickly.

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MM Novato FAQ

A common question people have when determining if they have bed bugs is “can bed bugs jump or fly?” This stems not just from general comparisons to other pests, like fleas or roaches, but also from some common misconceptions about bed bugs. Let’s go over the basics of bed bug movement to better understand how […]

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FAQ: Can bed bugs jump or fly? All about bed bug movement

Can bed bugs jump or fly?

A common question people have when determining if they have bed bugs is “can bed bugs jump or fly?” This stems not just from general comparisons to other pests, like fleas or roaches, but also from some common misconceptions about bed bugs. Let’s go over the basics of bed bug movement to better understand how they behave, and how we can use that to fight them:

First off, bed bugs are not equipped to fly. They do have front wings, but they are vestigial, meaning they have lost their function over time. The front wings on today’s bed bugs are reduced to small jointed pads, which aren’t capable of anything more than a slight wiggle while the bed bugs move or feed.

This is a common occurrence in evolution. Even humans have a few vestigial characteristics: we have muscles in our ears that allow some people to wiggle their ears slightly. These muscles are left over from when our ancestors had extended ears that could turn to the direction of a sound.

Unlike other insects that are incapable of flight, bed bugs can’t jump either. Their body is too wide and low to the ground, making it hard enough for their short legs to just keep them up and moving. While some people report bed bugs “jumping” from their walls or ceiling, this is more likely just a bug losing its grip and falling.

How do they move?

There really isn’t anything exciting about bed bug movement: they crawl. Due to their short legs and wide body, they crawl rather low to the ground at an even pace, about as quickly as an ant. While they can turn fairly quickly while moving, they’re not very good at picking up speed beyond their normal pace.

One thing bed bugs are fairly good at is climbing. They can make their way up most wood, cloths, paper, plastics, and even some metals. This is due to the small hooks in their feet, which grab onto small cracks and pores in textured surfaces. That reliance on hooks means that bed bugs have trouble climbing slick, smooth surfaces like porcelain or glass.

Due to their rather unathletic anatomy, bed bugs don’t do well in busy terrain, like hair or thick rugs. Their legs aren’t strong enough to push most materials aside, like most insects and other animals would when traversing through thick grass, brush, or hair. They also don’t burrow into skin or other materials, as they lack any sort of claws or other tools that would enable this.

How do they reach you in your bed?

Since bed bugs can’t jump or fly, they have to use their gifted crawling ability to reach you in your bed at night. They can do this by climbing up one of many possible access points, such as your bedroom’s walls, the legs of your bed frame, and any furniture or loose bedding that connects your bed to the floor.

To combat this, move your bed away from the wall and from other furniture, like nightstands and dressers. Also make sure that there are no hanging skirts or sheets that could be touching the floor, and that there’s no storage under the bed. Finally, place ClimbUp Interceptors under each leg of your bed. These have talcum-lined pitfalls that bed bugs can’t climb out of, preventing them from using your bed frame to reach you.

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